Would You Pass the Marshmallow Test?

The experiment is simple.  Leave a five year-old in a room with a marshmallow sitting on the table in front of him or her, with the following instructions: “I’m going to leave the room for fifteen minutes.  If you eat the marshmallow while I’m gone, that’s the only marshmallow you’ll get.  If you can wait the whole fifteen minutes, and don’t eat the marshmallow until I get back, you’ll get a second marshmallow.”  While this sounds quaint, and perhaps even a little trite, this experiment was indeed run in a highly scientific manner by Stanford professor Walter Mischel in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  The focus of the experiment, of course, is to measure individual children’s ability to employ delayed gratification, and the long-term follow up was to see how predictive their behavior was of long-term success in life.  The results were startling. A person’s five year-old response to the experiment, the level of delayed gratification they were able to demonstrate even back then, was a higher predictor of future success in life than any other measure, including IQ tests, SAT test, and anything else.  For all the fancy results and analysis those and other tests provide us, they are less predictive of success in life than whether your five year-old self can successfully delay gratification long enough to get the second marshmallow. This experiment, and others like it, speak to the power and importance of emotional intelligence.  For a very long time in our country, our focus was strictly intellectual
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The Hunt for Humility

An English teacher of mine, at some point in my schooling, asked our class a great question – “what is the definition of irony?”  She asked this in follow up after checking to see if we all understood what irony was, and the whole class had nodded yes, we did understand.  And yet when she posed this question, none of us could come up with a definition of irony in the moment.  We could name ironic moments or experiences, but we couldn’t actually come up with a workable definition.  Her point to us was that we don’t truly know what a word means until we can articulate its definition.  And I’ll admit, I still can’t define irony off the top of my head – I had to go look its meaning up again just now.  My teacher’s question though returned to me as I’ve been thinking about this October’s theme of Humility – what does humility actually mean? I’m not the only one to struggle with this question.  In the introduction to his book, Humility: The Quite Virtue, Everett L. Worthington, Jr. notes: “writing a book on humility is fraught with difficulties… I cannot tell you a definitive description of humility revealed by science… I can only invite you to consider people you know.  Who are your heroes of humility?”  He suggests that instead of a definition, the best way to understand humility is to list the characteristics of people you know who you think are humble. Figuring it was worth a
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Change: Hard, Challenging & Scary

A good friend of mine got engaged to his girlfriend about ten years ago– both of them were wonderful people, and they were a great match.  About six months after their engagement though, he began to exhibit a bizarre string of behaviors that were totally out of character for him. He began to do and say disrespectful – and sometimes outright mean – things to his fiancé. His fiancé didn’t get it, and we his friends didn’t get it either.  We all knew this guy to be a thoughtful considerate person, and he clearly loved his fiancé. So why was he all of a sudden acting like such a jerk? When some of us tried to talk to him about it, he couldn’t explain it or understand it either.  He told us he still loved his fiancé, that he was excited to marry her, he just kept having these inexplicable bursts of anger at her. Finally, thankfully, one of our more insightful friends figured out that his acting out started right after the couple had begun intensive work on planning their wedding, and a lightbulb went off. This realization allowed our friend to become aware of and name some of the deep fears and anxieties he had about marriage. Once he was able to be with and feel those feelings, the destructive and sabotaging behaviors melted away, and he and his fiancé were able to move forward with the wedding planning in a way that was meaningful to them both. Their
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Looking to the Future

Friends, we have so much to celebrate as a congregation.  Our church community is strong – we have been incredibly active the past three years that I’ve been here, and by all accounts this is a continuation of the active and healthy nature of our community for quite a while.  Among many, many other accomplishments over the past three years, we’ve put on a new roof and put solar panels on that roof, we’ve create new mission and visions statements, we’ve upgraded our communications and technology infrastructure, and we’ve increased our giving, both in our stewardship campaigns for the church as well as to other organizations in the community. I see us now moving into a stage of looking to the future.  Our mission and vision work last year set the stage – our mission statement of “Exploring faith. Practicing inclusivity. Living justice.” points us in the direction we need to be heading.  The challenge for us now is how do we live into our mission statement?  Concretely, on the ground, what does it mean for us to be called to explore our faith?  What does it mean to practice inclusivity on a day to day basis?  What does it look like to live justice in our lives?  Those are questions we’re going to have to wrestle with and grapple with, true to the nature of Unitarian Universalism. Fortunately, some answers are already starting to arise organically.  Our Grounds Vision task force, for example, has been asking a lot of terrific questions
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